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20130121
20130129
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
the crime. and dianne feinstein, for injecting religion into the gun control debate? is that appropriate? that's next. >> everyone in this city seems to live in terror of the gun lobby, but i believe that the gun lobby is no match for the cross lobby. especially when we stand together as people of all faiths, across the religious landscape of america. email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. >> new questions whether god is about to join the gun control debate after democratic senator dianne feinstein invites a clergyman to speak at the news conference where she rolled out his assault weapons ban proposal. ref rapid geri hall, the dean at the washington national cathedral urging worshippers yesterday to unite in favor of gun control. listen. >> as people of faith, we have the moral obligation to stand with and
not -- this is the supreme law of the land religion is part of me but it's not what i'm going to go to. he is not rick sanatorium he is a religious man. >> jennifer: sure, i get that. you are a performer. i'm curious what you thought about the performance of day, the delivery of this. normally you start a big speech with a couple of jokes. but you don't do that with the inauguration. >> not one president has ever told a joke in their inauguration. they tell jokes at the conventions, campaign trail, state of the union, even debates -- >> jennifer: it's so solemn. >> open a joke with what are all of you people doing my backyard something? [ laughter ] >> but i think president obama is savoring looking back at the crowd, that is human to me. he is a human being like all of us. >> jennifer: so this was also a -- these inaugural speeches some have been very brief, some very been very long. this was was 18 minutes. was it about the right length? >> i think so. jerry nabb the congressman from new york looks like he is falling asleep over and over. >> jennifer: yeah, we have his youngest d
they were born, regardless of their religion or their sexual orientation. those principles will direct our course as we introduce our first ten bills today, a tradition we've had in the united states senate. that is the majority party introduces the first ten bills. as we mend our broken immigration system, strengthen our schools and rebuild our roads and infrastructure we look to those measures in the bills. we balance the right to bear arms with regard to every right of children. we will balance spending reductions with revenue from the wealthiest among us. those principles will ensure military members never struggle for employment. those principles must be our guide. not a single piece of important legislation can pass the senate or become law without the votes of both democrats and republicans. so we'll be willing to compromise and work with our colleagues across the aisle. unfortunately, a number of bipartisan bills passed the senate during the last congress that were never acted upon by the house of representatives. so this year the senate will revisit some of those legislative prior
of the one that thomas more wore when he defy the king's unjust laws against religion. and from colombia, mr. o, you and miller should not rule out that we're the happiest people in the world here. most of us appreciate simple things like family and friends. been to colombia, a beautiful place especially cartagena. and we want to see the fresh show, are you coming to colorado? >> and we're going to the nokia, d.c., april 26th. long island june 1st and details on billoreilly.com. if you can't see us in person, bold and fresher
religions. jonathan hunt is here. hard to know whether egypt moved backward or forward. >> you can make an argument either way. we're just getting word via reuters that medics are saying in the city of suez at least four people have been killed by gunfire. and you look look at the square, they're saying the economy is the same and have swapped a secular dictatorship for another one. i spoke to a professor of diplomacy at harvard, and he said that who would have predicted two years ago egypt would still have a strong work relationship with the u.s., would have stood by the camp david peace accord so perhaps there's room for optimism. >> there is, i think, a ray of hope this keystone country, this very important country in the middle of the arab world, might be able to move forward, hasp in a very problematic way but not terribly destabilizing. >> listen to the caution in that as well. not tremendously destabilizing for the region. nobody knows the future. >> shepard: we don't have much strategy and the rest of the region is a disaster. >> of course, it is not just egypt we're concerned a
. at least 21 people are dead astor religion rains triggered two separate landslides. that's our top story as we go around the world in 80 seconds. iindonesia. the first one swept through a drilling field saturday night on an island in the west. state media reports several workers died but about 60 of them escaped. the other landslide hit a neighboring province a few hours later. officials say heavy mud and rocks have buried more than a dozen homes and trapped villagers. hundreds of people evacuated as rescuers dug through the debris for survivors. russia. rivers of hot lava pouring from a volcano in the far east. scientists wore special heat resistant clothes to get a closer look. the volcano started erupting back in november for the first time in four decades. the nearest town is 37 miles away. authorities say the smoke and poisonous gases pose no immediate threat but they warn locals carry protective masks. israel. giant flocks of migratory birds flying in striking formations across the southern skies. experts say the animals synchronized their movements to help find food and protect ag
, it was a replica of the one that thomas more wore when he defy the king's unjust laws against religion. and from colombia, mr. o, you and miller should not rule out that we're the happiest people in the world here. most of us appreciate simple things like family and friends. been to colombia, a beautiful place especially cartagena. and we want to see the fresh show, are you coming to colorado? >> and we're going to the nokia, d.c., april 26th. long island june 1st and details on billoreilly.com. if you can't see us in person, bold and fresher dvd's. monica, short, north carolina, my grandson alex, a fifth grader did a report on killing lincoln. i read it monica, excellent work for the tyke. and killing lincoln top five. and from italy, mr. o, please come here and rescue us from american liberals like george clooney. hopefully the italian government will make him pay his fair share on his majestic villa. i want to go trick-or-treating at his place and i may come over to lake cuomo around halloween. a great place, i love that whole area up there. and finally factor tip of the day. last night i rec
in 2003 for the pbs program "religion and ethics newsweekly." >> ifill: finally tonight, we begin a series of conversations on how the digital world affects, and infects, the culture we live in. back with us is our daily download team, who spent last year examining how the political campaign played out online. newshour political editor christina bellantoni takes it from there. for that we are joined by two journalists from the website daily download. howard kurtz is "newsweek"'s washington bureau chief and host of cnn's reliable sources. lauren, howy, welcome back this year. as technology has evolved employers are being forced to rewrite their social media rules. what is it that we're seeing? >> we're seeing a series of rulings from the national labor relations board. what we're finding is that workers are allowed to complain online, on facebook, if they want to improve wages and working conditions. otherwise, for get about it. >> you might think you'd get in trouble for dissing the boss in some of these cases. i guess there was one case where several case workers in buffalo got fired for
religion is to care for the widows and the orphans and jesus says at the last judgment it all comes down to how did you respond to the needs of the least of these. this is america at our best. at our best, we are a humble people and we remember the call to have passion for the least of these. that is why it's etched inside the sought of liberty give me your tired and poor, the send these the homeless to me. i lift my lamp beside the golden door. humility and compassion for the oh pressed are central to the heart and character and are meant to be central to the heart and character of this nation. the second thing we learn is the importance of having a vision. a professor retired from harvard business school noted tasks of any important leader are to cast a vision for the too much and to inspire people to pursue it. it has to be a clear picture of where we want to go, a preferred picture of the future. he led the slaves out of egypt but that was not enough. quickly they began to desire to go back to egypt. the wilderness was hard. he had to constantly remind them of the vision. he said her
for themselves. james has it this way, true religion undefiled before god is to care for the widows and the orphan and jesus as the last judgment all comes down to this, how did you respond to the needs of the least of these? this is america at our best. outer banks we are humble people and remember the call to have compassion for the least of these, which is why in this magnificent home in the statue of liberty or give me your tired, poor huddled masses yearning to breathe free. the rest age, sending us, the homeless to me. i lift my lamp beside the golden door. humility and courageous compassion for the marginalized in the oppressed are central to the heart and character of those days and are meant to be central to the heart and character of this nation. the second thing we learned from those days is the importance of having a vision. professor john potter now retired from business school netted two of the most important tasks of any theater are to cast a compelling vision for the future and inspire and motivate people to burst do it. that vision has to be clear and compelling pic
's own body should be left up to that woman in consultation with her doctor, her family, and her religion, not the federal government. there's now a generation of women who do not remember the time before roe vs. wade. a time when men assumed they could say what women could and could not do about their personal private health care and reproduction. we still have a lot of work to do. unfortunately, over the past 40 years there have been numerous legislative attempts to deny this right to women and treat women who exercise control over their own bodies as criminals. we have to make sure that we defend also title 10, maternal and child health care programs, public access to reproductive health care, and that we re-authorize the violence against women act. but we must remember the time before roe vs. wade. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from colorado seek recognition? if the gentlewoman from colorado is recognized for one minute. ms. degette: thank you, mr. speaker. yesterday in his inaugural address our president reminded us o
been contingent on progress from freedom of expression, freedom of religion. due process under the law. secretary clinton waived that so this could go to this new regime. this technology should not be going to this regime now. at the same time we need to find a way to ensure egypt doesn't give away the peace they have had with israel for a long time. that may be going any way because of the muslim brotherhood. dollars is how we have leverage. >>gretchen: do you think there's anything in the fine print that says you can only use these f-16's for specific purposes or not? >> how do we control it once they're in their hands? plus the relationship our military has had with their military for so long has eroded a little bit since the muslim brotherhood took over. once you hand these weapons over, i don't know that you have much control on how they're used. all the technology is not in them. they are not u.s. specs. their capabilities are below what ours are. still they can outfit them the way they want, use them as they fit. in the hands of the muslim brotherhood, this is not good. we have
and hijacking of an old and honored religion and what we need to do is find a way -- and this is something we have to work at -- for people to understand the degree to which that is happening and becoming in some places an excuse for their disenfranchisement, of being deprived of good can governance, jobs, opportunity and one of our missions is to not let that be an excuse. so i think that carrying the banner of religious tolerance, of diversity and pluralism is critical. we have raised that with president morsi. i think i was the first american to meet with the president before he even knew he was a candidate. and we talked about the need for the brotherhood to be able to respect the diversity of egypt. now that hasn't happened completely as we would like in the constitutional process. but as i said, that's an ongoing process and we need to work together to try to do it. but senator, you raise a central, central issue with respect to what is happening to the politics of certain regions of the world. and it's got to be front and center in our dialogue. >> thank you. >> senator corker, final c
, and then it talks about egyptian. it doesn't talk about their sex or religion or sex. it continues talking about egyptians as persons. so that's the whole thing. >> when you wanted to say something? >> [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i believe that the west must be aware of something. now, after the revolution the west wanted to deal with arab regimes that were similar to his own regime, similar to his own situation. they thought that the situation would be similar to what they had in the west. however, the people in the arab world don't want that. they want respect for their own specificities, they have their own conditions and their own contexts. what do we want as arab people? we don't want women to ware the veil -- wear the veil to remove the veil, we don't want to force them to wear the veil. we don't want to force anybody to do anything. now, of course, we are witnessing this movement and this transformation in our society, and we have some people who might force their wives or their daughters to wear the veil or to remove the veil. however, this is not the opinion of the mainst
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)